Curriculum in Physics Pre-semester

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Physics                              Chemistry                                Mathematics

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Course Curriculum

The duration of the written exam is 3 hours. The only aid allowed is a non-programmable calculator.

The exam covers the following:

1. Basic concepts

Introduction to the methods used in physics, basic physical measures, the International System of
Units and derived units

2. Statics

  • Forces (composition and decomposition of forces)
  • Hooke’s law, simple machines
  • Torque, equilibrium of a rigid body, centre of gravity

3. Kinematics and kinetics

  • Uniform motion and linear motion with constant acceleration, principle of superposition, composition of motion,
  • Newton’s laws, friction, work, energy, power, impact, momentum
  • Conservation of energy and momentum, applications (collisions)
  • Circular motion, planetary motion, gravity, work in the gravitational field, verification and effect of the rotation of the earth, rotation of a rigid body: Moment of Inertia, rotational energy, angular momentum, conservation laws, simple rotation problems, independent axis.

4. Oscillations and waves

  • Harmonic motion, the mathematical and physical pendulum, rotating pendulum, enforced oscillations and natural oscillation,
  • Wave motion, superposition and reflection of waves, the Doppler effect, the Huygen effect

5. Basics of magnetism

Permanent magnet, magnetic dipole, magnetic induction, magnetic field of the earth

6. Electric charge, electric induction

  • Coulomb’s law, electric fields (especially homogeneous and radial fields), electric field strength, work in an electric field, electric potential, voltage, parallel plate capacitor, cylindrical capacitor, capacity,
  • electric charge in uniform motion, matter in an electric field, energy of the electric field, energy
  • density.

7. Electric direct current

Effects of electric current, amperage, voltage, resistance, conduction mechanisms in solid and fluid bodies, in gases and vacuum (electron tube and semi-conductors), Ohm’s law, Kirchhoff’s rules, electric meters, electric work and power

8. Electromagnetism

Magnetic field of a coil, magnetic flux density, magnetic flux, induction law, magnetic induction, self inductance, matter in the magnetic field, Lorenz force, energy of the magnetic field, energy density, electromagnetic machines (electric motor, generator, electric magnet) transformer

9. Electric oscillations and electric waves

Coils, condensers and resistance according to Ohm in d.c. voltage and a.c. voltage, closing and opening of a circuit, electric resonant circuit, rms-value, Ohm’s resistance, inductive resistance and capacitative resistance, impedance, effective power, diode, triode, transistor, broadcasting, reception and propagation of electric waves

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Physics                              Chemistry                                Mathematics

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The Bachelor Program in Mechanical Engineering at Carl Benz School of Engineering. Germany

Like other Bachelor’s programs around the world, this one takes about four years (eight semesters), with graduation following the completion of a final written thesis. But unlike other programs the English-taught engineering courses offered are complemented by a series of German-taught interdisciplinary classes which include business administration and cultural issues. Additionally, multiple industrial internships are mandatory and an integral part of the program.

Preview of Syllabus – Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

In the first term or pre-semester (beginning in August prior to the winter semester) students take a set of science classes and tutorials designed to bring them up to the same level of necessary scientific background  corresponding to the German “Abitur” as well as to improve (if necessary) their English language skills. Intensive English and German classes are offered during the pre-semester. At the same time students are introduced to the basics of computer based study and work-techniques as well as to computer-based tools for “Office Applications”.

After this pre-semester, freshmen take written exams in English, Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics. The results of these examinations qualify as a cumulative entrance exam. The next 4 semesters of major courses cover the same material in mechanical engineering as the German-language “Vordiplom-Program” offered by the University. The next milestone to be  encountered is that all advanced mathematics I-II exams and all engineering mechanics I-II exams have to be passed for the students at the end of the 4th semester  in order to continue their studies.

The bachelor intermediate- diploma is equivalent to the german “Vordiplom” and should be accomplished within 6 semesters. The 6th to 8th semesters encompass English language lectures on selected topics of mechanical engineering, e.g. Fluid Mechanics, Systems and Control Engineering, Integrated Product Development and Industrial Plant Management. After the completion of the lecture curriculum the students have to write a bachelor thesis.

Furthermore, during spring and summer breaks between semesters, students are expected to successfully complete at least 16 weeks of industrial internships for the Bachelor Degree. If students want to continue their academic education with a Masters Degree they are able to choose from a variety of specialization topics offered at the mechanical engineering department.  But please note that some of these specialization topics will only be available in German. For a Master’s Degree 26 weeks of internship are required.

Of immediate concern for new entrants in the Carl Benz School is to successfully clear the pre-semester examination in October following which one actually qualifies to proceed further. Please check on the following links to see the relevant course curriculum during this short pre-semester period.

Pre-semester Physics Pre-semester Chemistry Pre-semester Mathematics

Response to an Aspiring Potential Candidate

Question:  Sir, I am currently studying in 12th grade (C.B.S.E) and I aspire to get into Carl Benz School of Engineering next year. Please guide me suitably.

Answer:

Dear Student,

Thank you very much for getting in touch with me and writing to me. If you are substantially a good student in your studies and have had decent upbringing and have certain specific and unique skills other than your academic excellence such as communication skills in written and spoken English and other languages, essay writing, competing in debates, quizzes, sports, music, art, computer programming etc. you can be admitted easily. Please note that the knowledge of German language is not a pre-requisite since the medium of instructions is English and you are expected to have good standard in English.  Now a days, CBS also insists that you should have cleared TOEFL or IELTS before  arriving in Karlsruhe. You may also plan to take this exam when it is most feasible for you. Most students who have studied in English medium schools do not have problem in clearing this exam.

While there is no applicable yardstick of minimum / cut-off percentage of marks for admission as it is common here in India, you certainly are expected to have achieved high enough percentage (~80% and above in most science subjects) in your Class 12 and in recent years. It is almost essential that you should have sound knowledge of key concepts of Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics that you have studied till Class 12.

CBS Class is usually a small and compact class of around 35 or 40 students selected from all over the world from different nationalities. While processing your application for admission, your selectors, who would also be your faculty teaching you most technical subjects, would want to ensure that your grasp of key concepts and basic understanding is good on which basis they can successfully teach you more complex and complicated aspects of science, technology and engineering in next 3-4 years.  Your selectors are also required to apply a criterion of maintaining inter-country as well as gender balance between fresh intake of students. Thus, it is not possible to define precisely the minimum essential parameters that you must fulfil to get selected. And even your best results may or may not be quite sufficient; however, your well-presented application with excellent credentials does maximize your chance of being selected.

When I know more about you, I shall guide you as to how you should present your case and what specific attributes of your personality could be highlighted.  For now, however, you must focus on your Class 12 studies and do your best at it. If and when, you get selected in CBS, you would be inducted in a 2 months pre-semester. Your faculty would give you a crash course of all you have studied in your 10+2 years essentially to bring all students from different countries having studied differently at a level playing field and to make sure that you all have adequate academic standards.  Irrespective of your academic achievement in your Class 12, if you do not satisfy your faculty about your academic brilliance in your pre-semester at CBS, your continuation for further studies can be abruptly terminated.

Thus, if you aspire to be a CBS student anyway, you must do a thorough introspection about yourself and determine that you are an above average talented and confident student and can really put in hard work to succeed in life. CBS would certainly be interest in taking you in if you have a promise of being successful in future in a leadership role in an internationally important engineering / manufacturing business.

Wishing you all the very best in your studies and career.

Sincerely yours,

Dr Rajendra Prasad

011-45630873

Why Study in Germany

Why Study in Germany?                  By Manisha Verma

Germany is world’s 3rd largest economy, and ranked at second place in export and R& D. Germany is also India’s most important EU business partner, especially for machinery, automobiles, chemical and electrical products as well as IT. The country is having more than 300 institutions of higher education; it is one of the top most countries in the field of research, science and technology.

Outstanding Academic Standards: The world-renowned of German Universities long back to the 14th Century and promise an outstanding level of education and research. Products of German companies, especially machine tools, motor vehicles and electrical engineering products are leading in the international market.

Economic Strength: Germany offers the best and the most cost effective study options for aspiring international students. Most of the universities are state-funded, so most of them charge no tuition fee from students. Students only need to bear their living expenses, such as accommodation, food, health insurance and transport.

International Exposure: Attracted by international study programmes, excellent research opportunities and low tuition fee more than 2,50,000 international students come to there to study. Study in Germany also gives you a wider exposure and experience of being an part of highly qualified academic community.

Plenty of Internships: Germany is the only country in the World where completion of study programs in Universities is normally followed by paid internships in top MNCs that ultimately lead to full-time placement. The close ties with leading companies such as Daimler-Chrysler, SAP, Siemens, BMW or Bosch will increase your career prospects.

Some special features:

Students are allowed to stay for one year after the completion of the study program. Your work permit could be further extended by that employer.

Country’s strong economic position has also led to the use of German as the preferred language of commerce in a number of Eastern European countries.

Learning German language will open the doors to various cultural centers of Europe: Berlin, Vienna, Geneva, Zurich, Frankfurt and Munich.

Permanent Residency permission within 5 years of working full-time in Germany.

German Immigration option is also valid for international students.

Minimum documentation required for visa process and no financial declaration documents required.

Part-time jobs allowed 20 hours per week making learning and living conditions within the reach of the students.

Source:http://studygermany.learnhub.com/lesson/19757-why-study-in-germany

Application for BSc (Mechanical Engineering) at CBS – for August -2013 intake

Application for BSc (Mechanical Engineering) at CBS – for August 2013 intake

Applicants for the BSc 2013 intake can start submitting their applications.
To enjoy the advantages of the early application and admission policy, applicants for the undergraduate mechanical engineering program have to make sure that their applications arrive before  15th April 2013. The general deadline for application is the 15th June 2013.

The one-week summer school this year is from 28th June to 5th July. Since the summer school is always very popular, it is generally advisable that interested applicants apply early. The Carl Benz School of Engineering looks forward to welcoming applicants from all over the world.

The application forms for the 2013 Bachelor of Science program in Mechanical Engineering and CBS summer school are now available and can be sent upon request to the Counsellor.

Future Prospects in Mechanical Engineering in India

Future Prospects in Mechanical Engineering in India
By - Sampurna Majumder

An Overview

One of the most appealing features of mechanical engineering is that, this field of study is extremely diverse. Almost all inventions since the history of mankind have involved direct application of mechanical engineering. Traditionally, mechanical engineers dealt with several concepts that included things like robotics, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, kinematics and many others that were required in designing state-of-the-art manufacturing units. Mechanical engineers are also responsible for contributing towards the development of several engines, power plants and other machineries. Mechanical engineers are not only involved in designing but also manufacturing.

However, with the passage time, as things undergo change, so did the traditional job description of a mechanical engineer. The scope of a mechanical engineer has expanded since long. They can focus on areas like development of composite materials, environmental conservation, nanotechnology and others. Now, the ever-increasing scope of job in this field also requires the professionals to get into marketing, finance and even resource management.

Mechanical Engineering—Degree or Diploma

Young Indians who are willing to pursue their higher studies in mechanical engineering can opt for the same, as there are several engineering colleges in India. Upon completing their high school studies,(10+2) with Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics one has to appear for the IIT-JEE and AIEEE for admission in various engineering colleges across the country. Upon completing a degree in mechanical engineering one can opt for an M.Tech or ME. In case anyone is willing to pursue an ME from any of the IITs, then the candidate will have to clear the Graduate Aptitude Test for Engineers (GATE). Nowadays, several engineering colleges are offering dual programmes combining B.Tech and M.Tech while others club engineering with several management courses as well.

Apart from a degree, students can also opt for a diploma from any polytechnic institute. A diploma in mechanical engineering can be pursued after completing class 10th examination with at least 50 per cent marks. The duration of a diploma is usually spans three years and if one opts for a part-time diploma it can be completed in four years.

Those who want to pursue a diploma can also opt for an associate membership qualification from the Institute of Mechanical Engineers, or Institution of Engineering.

Expenses/Scholarships

A graduate programme in Mechanical Engineering in a private institution would cost anywhere between Rs. 50000 to Rs. 200000 per annum. Nonetheless, if you are lucky enough to get through any of the IITs or a government engineering college, the expenses will be far less (around 30,000 to 40,000 per annum).

Moreover there are several scholarships available for meritorious students and students in need. Among Indian organizations, Indian Oil offers scholarships. Other institutions also offer scholarships in the same field.

Career Prospects and Remuneration

The job prospects in mechanical engineering are numerous. Mechanical engineers are required in designing, manufacturing, installing and operating systems that are used in innumerable industries. Both the government and the private sector employ mechanical engineers. Industries where they are usually employed comprise automobiles, space research, bio-mechanical and aeronautical industries.

The average monthly income of a mechanical engineer ranges somewhere between Rs. 10000 to Rs. 25000. Those who have a postgraduate degree can earn even more than this. Depending upon skill and experience, the pay package can go up to as high as Rs. 40 lakhs annually.

Considered the ‘mother’ of all fields of engineering, the career prospect in mechanical engineering is ample.

Source:

http://education-cafe.blogspot.com/2012/12/future-prospects-in-mechanical.html

Carl Benz – Passion for Engineering – Tradition in Engineering

“THE THINGS I HAVE ASPIRED TO AND CREATED ALL HAVE ROOTS WHICH LEAD BACK TO THIS INSTITUTION.”                                                           – Carl Benz, looking back on his studies in Karlsruhe

Benz’ Education

Carl Benz was born in 1844 in Karlsruhe, Baden, Germany. Despite the limited means of his family, his mother insisted upon providing him with a good technical education. Being a diligent student, Benz passed the entrance exam to study mechanical engineering at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, formerly University of Karlsruhe, formerly Polytechnic College. At the tender age of fifteen he came under the instruction of Ferdinand Redtenbacher and graduated on 9 July 1864, with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. During his years at the university he had already started to envision concepts for a vehicle that would eventually become the horseless carriage.

Benz and his first Inventions

In 1871, at the age of 27, Carl Benz joined a mechanical workshop in Mannheim. Early business misfortunes did not prevent Carl Benz from developing new types of engines and from patenting key engine components. These patents, among them the patent for the first internal combustion engine (granted in 1879), soon led to substantial revenue increases and helped to subsidize the workshop business. Carl Benz’ true genius became obvious thanks to his successive inventions, registered whilst designing what would become the production standard for his two-stroke engine. During this time he patented the speed regulation system, the ignition using sparks with a battery, the spark plug, the carburetor, the clutch, the gear shift, and the water radiator.

Benz and the Motorwagen

In 1887, after years of testing and modifications, Benz created the first definitive commercial vehicle, the Model 3, an automobile with a four-stroke engine of his own design between the rear wheels. It was gasoline powered, the power being transmitted by means of two roller chains to the rear axle with wooden wheels. This became the first production automobile. The model 3 was introduced at the 1889 World’s Fair in Paris
with the result that it was rapidly promoted on a wider international scale.

Expansion

In 1896, Carl Benz was granted a patent for his design of the first boxer engine with horizontally opposed pistons. His design created an engine in which the corresponding pistons reach top dead centre simultaneously, thus balancing each other with respect to momentum. Flat engines with four or fewer cylinders are most commonly boxer engines. This continues to be the design principle for high performance racing car engines such as those used by Porsche. The great demand for internal combustion engines increased the size of, and indeed, completely transformed the Benz & Cie. automobile company. By 1899 it had become the largest of its kind in the world, increasing employment from 50 (1890) to 430 (1899) workers and producing 572 automobiles per year.

Simultaneous Developments

While Benz was designing his boxer engine, Gottlieb Daimler and his lifelong partner Wilhelm Maybach, two gifted inventors in Stuttgart, were dreaming of creating small, high speed engines to be mounted in any kind of self-propelled vehicle. In 1885 they patented a precursor of the modern petrol engine, which they subsequently fitted to a two-wheeler considered to be the first motorcycle and, in the next year, to a stagecoach and a boat. Later, in 1890, they founded Daimler Motors (DMG). The first automobile originating from their design was sold in 1892. Although Gottlieb Daimler died in 1900 — and there is no evidence that Carl Benz and Gottlieb Daimler knew each other, nor that they knew about each other‘s early achievements — eventually, competition with Daimler Motors (DMG) in Stuttgart began to challenge the leadership of Benz & Cie. in Mannheim.

After World War I, the years of depression led to an economic crisis and it became desirable for both companies to pool their resources. In 1926, Benz & Cie. and the Daimler-Motor-Company merged to become the Daimler-Benz company, later to be renamed as Daimler-Benz, which is now part of the Daimler AG. After the merger in 1926, all new automobiles were called Mercedes-Benz in honor of the most important model of the DMG automobiles, the Mercedes 35hp.

Source: Carl Benz SChool of Engineering Image Brochure 2012

The History of Carl Benz


Mon, 2011-11-07 19:23 — Carl Benz Academy…

Carl Benz was born in 1844 in Karlsruhe, Baden, Germany, a son of an engine driver. Despite the limited means of his family, his mother insisted upon providing him with a good technical education. Being a diligent student, Benz passed the entrance exam to study mechanical engineering at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), formerly known as the Polytechnic College. At the tender age of fifteen he came under the instruction of Ferdinand Redtenbacher and graduated on July 9, 1864, with a degree in mechanical engineering. During his years at the university he had already started to envision concepts for a vehicle that would eventually become the horseless carriage.

In 1871, at the age of twenty-seven, Carl Benz joined a mechanical workshop in Mannheim, working together with his friend August Ritter. He first began his work on a two-stroke engine in the hopes of finding new sources of income and despite some early business misfortunes, successfully developed new types of engines and patented key engine components. These patents, among them the patent for the first internal combustion engine (approved in 1879), soon led to substantial revenue increases and helped to subsidize the workshop business.

Carl Benz’ true genius became obvious thanks to his successive inventions registered whilst designing what would become the production standard for his two-stroke engine. During this time he patented the speed regulation system, the ignition using sparks with a battery, the spark plug, the carburetor, the clutch, the gear shift, and the water radiator.

The success of the company gave Carl Benz the opportunity to indulge in his old passion of designing a horseless carriage. He finished his creation in 1885 and named it the Benz Patent Motorwagen. It was the first automobile entirely designed as such to generate its own power, which is why Carl Benz was granted his patent and is regarded as its inventor. The car was first driven in Mannheim in 1885.

In 1887, after years of testing and modifications, Benz created the first definitive commercial vehicle, the Model 3, an automobile with a four-stroke engine of his own design which was gasoline powered, with wooden wheels. This became the first production automobile. The model 3 was introduced at the 1889 World Fair in Paris and soon received recognition from around the world.

In the 1880′s, automobile owners faced considerable problems as gasoline was only available from pharmacies. The early 1888 version of the “Motorwagen” had to be pushed when driving up a steep hill. This limitation was rectified after Berta Benz made her famous trip, driving one of the vehicles a great distance. On returning, she suggested the addition of another gear to her husband. The popular story goes, that on the morning of August 5, 1888, Berta Benz borrowed this vehicle (without the knowledge of her husband), and embarked on a 106 km (fifty mile) trip from Mannheim to Pforzheim to visit her mother, taking her sons Eugene and Richard with her. In addition to having to scrounge for fuel at pharmacies on the way, she also overcame various technical difficulties and finally arrived at nightfall announcing the achievement to Carl Benz by telegram.

In 1896, Carl Benz was granted a patent for his design of the first ‘boxer engine’ with horizontally-opposed pistons, a design principle which still remains relevant for high-performance racing car engines such as those used by Porsche. The great demand for internal combustion engines increased the size of, and indeed, completely transformed the Benz & Cie. automobile company. By 1899 it had become the largest of its kind in the world, increasing employment from 50 (1890) to 430 (1899) workers and producing 572 automobiles per year.

After World War I, the years of Depression led to an economic crisis and it became desirable for Benz & Cie to pool its resources with another leading company in Stuttgart, Daimler Motors, founded by Gottlieb Daimler and his lifelong partner Wilhelm Maybach. In 1926 the two merged to become the Daimler-Benz company, later to be renamed as Daimler-Benz, which is now part of Daimler AG. Following the merger in 1926, all new automobiles were called Mercedes-Benz in honor of the most important model of DMG automobiles, the Mercedes 35hp.

The name ‘Mercedes’ derives from the ten year-old daughter of Emil Jellinek, the wealthy European entrepreneur who sat on the board of Daimler Motoren Gesellschaft (DMG) in the early 1900′s and who helped to improve the design of the DMG engines.

Carl Benz served as a member of the supervisory board of Daimler AG from 1926 until he passed away in 1929.

(Source: https://www.benz-academy.org/en/about/Carl_Benz)

University of Karlsruhe

University Of Karlsruhe

The University of Karlsruhe, which is also known as Fridericiana, was established in 1825, and is located in Karlsruhe, Germany. The university started as a polytechnic school. Grand Duke Frederick I of Baden raised the status from school to a university in 1865. It was renamed as Institute of Technology in 1885 and became a full fledged university in 1967. Fridericiana’s recent enrollments have been more than 18,000 students. The university offers undergraduate and graduate programs of study through the following academic divisions:

* Architecture
* Chemical and Process Engineering
* Chemistry and Biology
* Civil engineering, Geology, and Ecological Sciences
* Computer Science
* Economics
* Electrical engineering and Information Technology
* Humanities and Social sciences
* Mathematics
* Mechanical Engineering
* Physics

Qualified instructors train the students for various types of sports. The university publishes an online magazine known as clicKIT. This magazine is published three times per semester. The students are associated with organizations like Protestant Student Community, IEEE Student Branch Karlsruhe, Students of the community,Business Masters Karlsruhe eV and Students for Christ.
The university alumni include eminent personalities such as Georg Karl Wilhelm Hamel, a mathematician; Hermann Hummel, politician and chemist; Edward Teller, theoretical physicist, Karl Friedrich Benz, an automobile engineer; and many others.
Campus Location

Kaiserstraße 12serstraße 12
Karlsruhe 76131
Germany
Main Tel: +49(0)721/608-0

University Web Site : http://www.uni-karlsruhe.de/index_en.php

Source: http://www.braintrack.com/college/i/university-of-karlsruhe

University-Industry Collaboration and Its Impact on Manufacturing

Leading German and U.S. experts discussed best practice examples of university-industry relations and their impact on regional development at the German Center for Research and Innovation on November 7, 2012.

In the U.S., Albany and Pittsburgh are examples of regions in which the economy has turned around as a result of successful university-industry collaboration. According to Dr. Marc Malandro, Associate Vice Chancellor for Technology Management and Commercialization at the University of Pittsburgh, the university’s commercialization efforts and industrial invention transfers have led to a “manufacturing comeback.” The university’s start-up companies have attracted over $400 million in investments to the Pittsburgh region.

Dr. Robert E. Geer, Chief Academic Officer at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE), University of Albany, SUNY, presented CNSE as a financially and technically competitive environment to empower nanotech companies in New York State. Based on a shared-use co-location model, CNSE established an on-campus work and life infrastructure for students, faculty members, and collaborating companies, and provides shared facilities, joint investments and financing opportunities.

Dr. Bernd Reissert, President of the Berlin School of Economics and Law, indicated that innovation capacity in Germany is linked to firms’ embeddedness into a highly decentralized system of research organizations and applications oriented universities. Whereas American universities collaborate with larger companies for additional resources to conduct basic research, German educational institutions partner with SMEs on a client-based scale. Dr. Hans-Jürgen Pfisterer, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Osnabrück University of Applied Sciences, highlighted labor market differences. The “German Mittelstand,” which consists of mostly family-owned small and medium-sized companies, considers a candidate’s potential and personality for long-term job development. U.S. companies tend to hire top-of-the-field candidates for particular job purposes.

The speakers agreed on a common interest in public investment for education, training, and research. Innovative German and U.S. manufacturers depend on universities to cultivate a highly skilled and adaptable workforce. The benefits of university-industry collaboration are two-fold: Companies share resources and investments, while universities serve as early-stage recruitment centers where students train with cutting-edge equipment and are integrated into work environments of future employers. Dr. Kaushik Kumar from Tokyo Electron (TEL), which established its first R&D facility outside of Japan on the CNSE campus, emphasized that “without a qualified workforce, we are not able to push R&D forward.”

Successful university-industry collaboration results in increased workforce development and more students. The economic impact can be measured with the number of companies attracted to the university, regional investments, and job creation.

The event was sponsored by the German Center for Research and Innovation and UAS7, German Universities of Applied Sciences. UAS7 is a strategic alliance of seven leading German universities of applied sciences committed to excellence in teaching and research. This ‘alliance for excellence‘ includes the Berlin School of Economics and Law, Bremen University of Applied Sciences (UAS), Cologne UAS, Hamburg UAS, Munich UAS, Münster UAS and Osnabrück UAS. UAS7 is represented in the U.S. and Canada by its Liaison Office in New York City.

A video of the event can be watched (http://vimeo.com/53196740)

The German Center for Research and Innovation provides information and support for the realization of cooperative and collaborative projects between North America and Germany. With the goal of enhancing communication on the critical challenges of the 21st century, GCRI hosts a wide range of events from lectures and exhibitions to workshops and science dinners. Opened in February 2010, GCRI was created as a cornerstone of the German government’s initiative to internationalize science and research and is one of five centers worldwide.

Source: http://www.kooperation-international.de/en/detail/info/university-industry-collaboration-and-its-impact-on-manufacturing-1.html

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